AltaFolks


Thanks to Lawren Markle for the reminder of this afternoon event to hit before you head over to the one year anniversary party at The Ale House at 5pm!

Old Marengo Park at Woodbury and Marengo will be dedicated as an Altadena Heritage Area thanks to the efforts of
the Arroyos & Foothills Conservancy being honored by Altadena Heritage. It’s just one worthy effort local groups are making to preserve open space in the foothills. The following is from the  Old Marengo Park release:

Located on the border of Pasadena and Altadena, the park is planted with native trees and plants to demonstrate how low-water gardening can succeed. In-ground catchment basins allow heavy rains to seep down quickly to
recharge groundwater, rather than flow into storm drains and into the ocean. As more landscapers utilize these features, drinking water is conserved, water quality at the beaches improves and heavy rains soak in and do more good.

Funding was provided by Los Angeles County Regional Park and Open Space District, Metropolitan Water District of Southern California, Neighborhood UU Church, Foothill Municipal Water District, and donations from many supporters.

The park was made possible by the work of many people, including area residents. Altadena Heritage recognizes not only the hard work AFC, but the work and donated services of many supporting partners like Mountain View Cemetery, Pasadena Water and Power, J. Harold Mitchell Co. of Altadena, Rain Bird Corporation, Mark Goldschmidt
Design, and PB Construction. Special thanks to L.A. County Supervisor Michael D Antonovich, Altadena Watershed Committee, and Altadena Heritage, along with former AFC board member Rick Carron, AFC board member Michelle Markman, and the tireless Watershed Committee chair Michele Zack who was instrumental in the success of
the park.

“It’s a small park, but it makes a big impact on the area,” said John Howell, AFC’s executive director. “We hope people will enjoy seeing how native plants can be used wonderfully in our gardens, and get ideas about capturing and saving water.”

For a more detailed history of the park, you can read AFC’s newsletter from 2008 here; http://www.arroyosfoothills.org/newsletters/afcnl2008_08.pdf

Since working on the park, AFC has also completed a major successful acquisition of 41 acres in Rubio Canyon, Altadena, and is working to preserve more open space in Pasadena, La Canada, La Crescenta, Altadena, and the neighboring foothills and arroyos.

To learn more or to donate, visit http://www.arroyosfoothills.org. You can also contact AFC executive director John Howell at 626-796-3004, or johnhowell@arroyosfoothills.org.

About the Arroyos & Foothills Conservancy

Arroyos & Foothills Conservancy is a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation. Founded in 2000
as Altadena Foothills Conservancy, its project area now encompasses the foothills and
communities of Pasadena, La Canada-Flintridge, Glendale and La Crescenta, along with
Altadena and adjacent areas.

AFC works to preserve natural open spaces, protecting scenic landscapes, native plants
and wildlife, streams and water, and trails and historic sites. It collaborates with property
owners, governments, land trusts, private donors and other stakeholders to acquire,
restore, protect and maintain these natural areas.

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People, we do have power. Don’t forget that.

From: Arroyo Seco News <news@arroyoseco.org>
Date: Tuesday, March 1, 2011, 4:27 PM

WE WON!!!
The Los Angeles County Supervisors today approved a motion instructing the County Department of Public Works to conduct a full environmental impact report on the sediment management program at Devil’s Gate Dam and Hahamongna in the Arroyo Seco. The motion, introduced by Supervisor Mike Antonovich,  included a provision that Public Works staff report back to the Supervisors within 90 days on short-term measures that might be needed to ensure the functioning and safety of the dam. Supervisors Antonovich, Zaroslavsky and Ridley-Thomas supported the motion. Supervisors Molina and Knabe abstained.
Just a month ago, it seemed a foregone conclusion that the DPW would proceed without an environmental review on the basis of an Emergency Declaration. But then a storm of public concern about the 170,000 trucks and pollution and habitat destruction as well as the fallout from the destruction of the Arcadia Woodlands changed the whole picture.  The Save Hahamongna petition, which collected over 540 signatures in just a few weeks, focused the opposition tactically, and the Pasadena City Council waded in on Monday night with a resolution supporting Supervisor Antonovich’s motion.  At the Supervisors’ Meeting this morning, the County Counsel indicated that it was now the intent of DPW to pursue the project based on a maintenance exemption rather than an emergency declaration, but all the wiggling and persuasion of the Public Works managers was not convincing to the majority of the Supervisors.
Today’s victory is the first step in ensuring that Hahamongna and its nature as well as the local neighborhoods are protected. A very important step in the right direction!  We are sure that everyone, including the County, will come out winners from a better program that includes the evaluation of impacts and alternatives and fully involves the cities and stakeholders.
Congratulations to everyone involved.   Let’s party!
ASN

Congratulations to all the Hahamongna Bloggers who are receiving the Best Advocacy award from the Arroyo Seco Foundation. It was quite an effort. Wonder what else we can tackle?

Altadena Above It All
Altadena Hiker
Arroyo Lover
A Thinking Stomach
Avenue to the Sky
East of Allen
Finnegan Begin Again
Go Deep…Find Truth
Greensward Civitas
LA Creek Freak
Mendolonium
Mister Earl’s Musings
My Life With Tommy
Pasadena 91105 and Beyond
Pasadena Adjacent
Pasadena Latina
SaveHahamongna.org
Selvage
Temple City Daily Photo
The Sky Is Big In Pasadena
Webster’s Fine Stationers Web Log
West Coast Grrlie Blather

Arroyo Verde Awards Announced

The winners of the 2010 Arroyo Verde Awards were announced today.

The Arroyo Verde (Green Arroyo) Awards are the most prestigious local environmental awards.  The awards recognize those who have made a valuable contribution to protecting and improving the Arroyo Seco watershed and our local communities during the past year.

  • Advocacy Award – The Hahamongna Bloggers
  • Greening the Arroyo – Agency – Foothill Municipal Water District
  • Greening the Arroyo – Organization – Urban Semillas and Miguel Luna
  • Greening the Arroyo – Business – Arroyo Vista Inn
  • Volunteers – Arroyo Green Team – Audubon Center at Debs Park
  • Citizen Activist – Nicole Possert
  • Public Official – South Pasadena Mayor Pro Tempore Michael Cacciotti
  • Special Award – Virgina Neely

The 2010 Arroyo Verde Awards will be presented this Thursday at a festive holiday gathering sponsored by the Arroyo Seco Foundation and the Council of Arroyo Seco Organizations (CASO) at Kidspace Children’s Museum, 480 N. Arroyo Blvd., Pasadena. Refreshments and networking begin at 6:30 pm. The awards ceremony begins at 7:00 pm.

Celebrate the Arroyo Holiday Spirit
Kidspace Childrens Museum, Pasadena
Thursday 6:30pm

For more information or to make a reservation, please go to:

http://www.arroyoseco.org/avawards2010.htm

Driving up Fair Oaks and what do I see while the sky is pouring on us?

Art on Palm, Altadena

9:30 a.m.−5 p.m.

1419 E. Palm Ave.

 

One of the great things about a community with personality, namely Altadena, is the incredibly creative people who live here. Two such people, Catherine Cowles and Mary Jane Elgin, started what has become a regular event, Art on Palm.

 

Catherine says, “about five years ago Mary Jane and I were talking about selling our artwork. I mentioned that since she had a fabulous home on 1439 E. Palm Street—which she recently sold—she had the perfect setting to sell her work. She said she wasn’t interested in doing a solo show. My heart sank. But she said she would do one to include other artists if I helped her. Joy!

 

“We began with about 11 artists; friends from our clay class and a jeweler. The show was a hit. It had a nice vibe, fabulous location and supportive and interested community. Since then we’ve slowly added artists whose work we admire.”

 

The show took on a deeper cause after the war began in Iraq. “We decided to ask our fellow artists to contribute five percent of their sales to the West L.A. Fisher House Foundation.” (The West Los Angeles Fisher House provides housing for family members of veterans while they are undergoing long term care at the VA hospital.)

 

“When Mary Jane sold her large home, we were concerned about the future of our little venture. But she approached neighbors Maryrose Smyth and Mark Pickett and they graciously invited us to use their lovely canyon garden. The coming show is our 11th and we’ll have about 31 artists.”

 

Maryrose and her husband Mark Pickett are holding the show in their secluded enclave, called Wildwood Park, designed by Henry Green in 1920. I stumbled on this area a couple of years ago when out shooting photos of local gardens. I felt like I was in a national park with its rustic homes, outdoor fireplace, and trails. In fact, it was designed as a hunting lodge. Maryrose and her husband bought the house at 1419 E. Palm about six years ago, and didn’t stop there.

 

 “Mark and I had one house, and we bought the house next door when the owners moved. We never thought we’d get the chance.” Maryrose and Mark didn’t want to take the chance of someone moving in who didn’t have artistic sensibilities.

 

“We’re raising two boys here. It’s the perfect, wonderfully childhood dream environment. And we have lots of neighborhood children.”

 

She says most of the artists have known each other a long time, and have ties to Creative Arts Group in Sierra Madre. “I come from a tradition of realism, and now I’m more out on a limb, painting more personal interior landscapes.” No doubt her environment is having an influence on her work. “It’s quiet, green, lush. Feels like you’re not in an urban environment.”

 

The show features a wide array of artists in tents and at tables. “There will be works on paper in all media, photography, a whittler, two or three are potters, and jewelry. Last time we were in the field and it was hot, now everybody will be under the trees, and circle the properties.”

Refreshments provided by Jones Coffee Roasters of Pasadena.  

You can check our Maryrose’s work at www.studiosmyth.com

Other participating artists:

Stephani  Anderson 
Jane Asari

Erica Batchelder

Janet Chico

Catherine M. S. Cowles

Ellen Dinerman

Mary Jane Elgin

Bill Haske

Lynn Hendricks

Jim Heuston

Stephen  Johnstone

Beverly Jones

Susan Kromka

Elizabeth Manak

Betsy Miller

Dana Sue Miller

Katherine Nakazono

Detra Prete

Cathy Reichel-Clark

Di Yamamoto Skowron

Anne Sears

Susan Spinks

Kathleen Swaydan

Anna Vosburg

Lys Wilcox

Bruce Wilson

Kaylie James Wilson

Stephen Woodruff

Hitomi Yamamuro

Lucia Yang

Here’s the Pasadena Weekly story on the film “Lakeview Terrace,” that is apparently based on a real-life story in Altadena…

I had an LAPD officer living behind me and a Sheriff next door, and I’m happy to say I’ve had no problems. Felt quite safe.

http://www.pasadenaweekly.com/cms/story/detail/copping_out/6402/

N E W S ITEM FROM CALTECH ABOUT LOCAL RESIDENT Geneticist Giuseppe Attardi

PASADENA, Calif.-Giuseppe Attardi, whose work linked degenerative diseases and aging to genetic mutations, died at his home in Altadena on Saturday, April 5. He was 84 years old.

Attardi, the California Institute of Technology’s Steele Professor of Molecular Biology, was among the first scientists to delve into the processes through which DNA’s information is transferred. He identified all the genes of the DNA in human mitochondria–often called the powerhouses of biological cells. He then developed techniques for investigating genetic diseases, including Alzheimer’s, and aging in general, which he discovered is associated with changes in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA).

Born in 1923 in Vicari, Italy, a town of less than 3,000 people in the Province of Palermo, Attardi earned an MD from the University of Padua in 1947. He remained there for almost 10 years as an assistant professor in the Institute for Histology and General Embryology.
During those years, he also visited the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, as a research fellow in cell research and genetics, and the Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine as a Fulbright Fellow.

Still on the Fulbright Fellowship, Attardi arrived at Caltech in 1959. He was appointed associate professor of molecular biology four years later. It was at Caltech that Attardi turned his interests to mitochondria, establishing that mtDNA is an active, working genome.
This spurred research into the organelle’s genetic machinery.

David Chan, an associate professor of biology and Attardi’s colleague and friend, credits Attardi with being a leading figure in identifying the products and functions of the mitochondrial genome.
Attardi and a student developed a technique in which they replaced the mtDNA of a human cell line with the mtDNA from diseased cells.
This allowed them to distinguish the roles of mtDNA and the genome of the nucleus–where the rest of a cell’s DNA resides–in causing the disease. With this technique, they could also examine the relationship between changes in mtDNA and changes in cell function caused by the disease. “Many labs have used his approach to understand how mutations in mtDNA diseases affect mitochondrial function,” Chan says.

“Giuseppe was one of the founders of what is now a central and still-expanding area of molecular cell biology,” adds Attardi’s colleague and friend Gottfried Schatz, emeritus professor of biochemistry at the University of Basel’s Biozentrum, in Switzerland.
“His unique insights bore magnificent fruits with the landmark description of the transcription map of mammalian mtDNA, as well as the precise characterization of the mechanism of mitochondrial diseases and the dynamics of human mitochondrial genomes.”

In recent years, researchers in Attardi’s lab at Caltech have focused on how mtDNA replicates, and on detecting mutations that result from aging, and what affects those mutations have. The team discovered that older people carry a significantly greater number of genetic defects in a specific region of their mtDNA, suggesting that cell aging begins in the mitochondria.

“He has been a central figure in mitochondrial research for several decades. One of the things I will always remember about him is his constant excitement for all types of biological questions,” Chan says. “I think his intense curiosity is one reason he accomplished so much as a scientist.”

Schatz adds, “To him, science was everything and he never tired of discussing the latest experiments. Yet he also embodied a vanishing breed of scientists whom I would define as ‘gentlemen intellectuals.’
He had a superb grasp of European history and world culture, had mastered French and German at a very high level of proficiency, and even in his most spirited discussions refrained from personal invective or overt aggression. To me, he was an example of how science can keep us young in spirit, and ennoble us.”

During his career, Attardi garnered several distinctions. They include two Guggenheim Fellowships; election to the National Academy of Sciences; the Antonio Feltrinelli International Prize for Medicine from the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei; a degree of doctor honoris causa from the University of Zaragoza, Spain; the Passano Foundation Award in 2000; and the Gairdner Foundation International Prize.

Attardi is survived by his wife and fellow researcher, Anne Chomyn, a senior research fellow, emeritus, at Caltech; a son, Luigi Attardi, of Rome; a daughter, Laura Attardi, of Palo Alto, who is a professor of cancer biology at Stanford University; and a grandson, Marcello Attardi, of Palo Alto.
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Visit the Caltech Media Relations website at http://pr.caltech.edu/media.

Elisabeth Nadin, science writer
Caltech Media Relations

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